Things To Do In Brussels

If you’re looking for a fantastic place to head to on your next city break, look no further than Belgian city Brussels. From taking in the sights and sounds of the city centre to relaxing in a quiet, friendly bar over one of the locally-brewed beers, Brussels is a holiday destination that truly has it all.

While many of us think of beer when Belgium is mentioned, it’s certainly not all that Brussels city has to offer – though it’s only natural that you’d want to sample some of the local goods. You’ll also find plenty of history and culture, from fascinating museums and architecture to colourful festivals, parades and parties – a far cry from the notion that all Belgium has to offer is some of our favourite lagers!

The city’s rich history is celebrated in no less than 80 museums. As well as a number of excellent art galleries, highlights include a beer museum and several buildings designed by celebrated architect Victor Horta. Travelers might also enjoy the Bellevue Museum, which is the official museum of the Belgian Royal Family. The building is an attraction in itself having once been used as a royal residence.

In addition to its great cultural attractions, Brussels also boasts a fun, vibrant nightlife scene and there are more than 400 different kinds of beer offered in the city’s many bars! A popular hangout after dark is the central square, Place Saint-Gery, which is home to a number of fashionable cafes and luckily accessible from most Brussels hostels so travelers can find their way back after a long night sampling the local brews.

Sablon Markets : This is the oldest market in Europe and a great place to wander through the collection of over 100 stores. Over the years, numerous markets have found a home on the Place du Grand Sablon: a horse market, followed by a hay market (which gave its name to the “rue de la Paille”); a textile market; and a vegetable market. Now it is home to a brilliant antique market, which began when Mr. George Van de Weghe and the then priest of the Sablon church met and discussed Van de Weghe’s request to display his engravings at the end of mass. The markets only run on the weekends, but they are the perfect place to sample the delights of Belgian chocolate or pick up that great antique. It is truly a delightful market to venture to and conveniently located only a short walk from your Brussels city hotel.

Following the shops all the way down Rue Neuve Street takes you to the Stock Exchange building on your right, and you know you have reached the surroundings of Rue Dansaert where the Romans founded Brussels in the 10th century. However, unlike its history, the area has all contemporary shops. The place is rather trendy with Belgium designers’ boutiques, clothing and accessories stores and more.

One can’t be comfortable in travelling by air. When the things come about your taste and comfort than nothing can be better than travelling by Eurostar. Eurostar is direct high speed service to Brussels. There are about 10 daily services to Brussels called London Brussels trains. And obviously time is another factor 95% of Eurostar trains arrive on time. You can book standard class seat or business premier. One can do his/her work without any disturbance. Eurostar is also providing loyalty programs and discount schemes for their customers like Eurostar Plus Point and other.

How to Cook Brussels Sprouts

I have a new love in my life! Brussels sprouts – how could I forsake thee for so long? Okay, so maybe I exaggerate a little bit on my recent imfatuation  with that distinct Brussels sprouts taste, but not by much. I started eating Brussels sprouts again when they first showed up at my local farmer’s market at the end of the season in September, and I’ve been chomping then down ever since. At my Thanksgiving dinner table, the Brussels sprouts were the first to go. What can I say, except that a love of cruciferous vegetables clearly runs in my gene pool.

My mother now loves Brussels sprouts, but she hated them for years after being forced to eat my grandmother’s “boiled-to-death” Brussels sprouts. I think this is why so many people are afraid of these cute little cabbages. Frankly, I think people are so turned off by them because they don’t know how to cook Brussels sprouts. There are a myriad of ways to prepare them, from sauteed Brussels sprouts to steamed Brussels sprouts, but for my money nothing beats roasting them!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Ingredients:

Brussels sprouts
Black pepper, freshly cracked
Olive oil

Instructions:

Pre-heat your oven to 375 degrees F
Rinse your Brussels sprouts and cut them in half. If you have larger ones, cut them into thirds so that all the pieces are of uniform size.
Place a piece of aluminum foil on a baking sheet and arrange the sprouts on the sheet cut side up. They will shrink in the oven, so don’t worry about spacing. Cram as many as you can on your one cookie sheet.
Break out your pepper mill and liberally grind black pepper all over the Brussels sprouts. I like my sprouts my a nice bite to them, so don’t be shy about your black pepper!
Coat the baking sheet with extra virgin olive oil, or whatever flavorful vegetable oil you like.
Put the sheet in the oven and bake until they have taken on an even golden brown color. Expect to have them in the oven for at least 20 minutes or so.

That’s it! Roasted Brussels sprouts are one of the easiest things in the world to make, and they are delicious. Honestly, I could eat them like potato chips because they’re that good.  Truthfully, this is more of a cooking guide than a recipe, because I think it’s too simple to be a true recipe. Feel free to modify as you see fit in terms of flavor, but in my experience less is more when it comes to Brussels sprouts. I feel a bit blasphemous saying that because I add lots of spices to almost anything, but in this instance I think it’s totally true.

Along that line, choosing high quality ingredients makes a big difference in final taste, but I’ve made this with frozen Brussels sprouts before and the end result was still delicious. Also, I don’t cook with a lot of salt (stupid family history of hypertension) but some cracked sea salt or some kosher salt would be a great addition here.

As you start planning your next dinner, consider these roasted Brussels sprouts, as I guarantee that everyone will rave about that Brussels sprouts taste.

Your turn: Do you like Brussels sprouts? What is your favorite way to prepare them?